Button 2 Session 2 Sat

ANONYMOUS 'MEL'

ANONYMOUS 'MEL'

FAMILY COURTS AND PRIVATE LAW HEARINGS: A SAFE HAVEN FOR ABUSIVE MEN TO CONTINUE TO EXERT CONTROLLING BEHAVIOUR AND COERCION: DOMESTIC ABUSE BY PROXY

It has been suggested that the family court system is broken.  The system isn’t broken; it was never set up to be fit for purpose in the first place. 

The setup of the family court system stems from a time when a mother and child were considered a possession of the father. Has this changed?   Relationship types may have changed, but inequity remains.  This may be considered controversial and denied; however countless decisions continue to be made which reflect this and the way women and children are treated within the family courts is testament to how systemic this belief system continues to exist and how difficult it is to change.

The systems in place do not protect and they do not prevent harm or death. The number of homicides following family court decisions reflect this. There is no accountability and no recourse to complain about the decisions except at a cost. 

Unless the Elephant in the room (family courts) gets a grip and tackles how they treat women and children and has a zero tolerance to domestic violence and perpetrators of abuse, this archaic institution will continue to reward perpetrators and continue to endanger mothers and their children by their decision making of unsafe contact and change of residency.

SHAZIA CHOUDHRY

SHAZIA CHOUDHRY

CHILD CONTACT, DOMESTIC ABUSE AND THE IMPACT OF HUMAN RIGHTS

The relevant law and policy in the area of child contact, domestic abuse and human rights will be briefly outlined along with issues that have been raised in practice.  An outline will also be provided of recent research conducted with Women’s Aid England on this issue and the findings.  The implication of these findings in relation to victims of violence and the use of human rights law will be discussed.