SALOME MBUGUA

SALOME MBUGUA

Lords of Poverty; Plight of African Women in Prostitution in Europe

Salome Mbugua, born in Kenya, has founded two human rights organisations in Ireland (Wezesha Dada and Akidwa) and currently serves as chair of European Network of Migrant Women (ENOMW). She has over 25 years of experience in grass root mobilization, political advocacy for women/human rights, policy development and feminist research.  She has initiated, led and succeeded with two public campaigns in Ireland - against Female Genital Mutilation and Against Deportation of Irish Born Citizens- and has done research and documented stories of asylum seeking and refugee women, gender based violence in conflict, trauma and mental health, racism and inequality.  She works in Ireland, Europe and Africa, where her organistion runs programmes aimed at empowering women & children affected by conflict, violence and poverty.

Salome will be involved in the following FiLiA session:
Sexual Exploitation: where Misogyny and Racism meet          (Saturday Afternoon)

Abstract:

I will speak about the situation of extreme poverty and lack of opportunities for African women as contributing factors to their exploitation in the sex trade; how moving to Europe in hope for better life turns into a more disempowering situation, the cycle of violence and exploitation; the particularly grave situation of West African women increasingly subjected to organized trans-national sex trade; about how African women are sexually harassed and pushed into prostitution throughout their asylum application process. I will also explain about the lasting traumatic consequences all this has on their mental health and well-being.

http://wezeshadada.com/

http://akidwa.ie/;  

@Salomembugua

@AkiDwa

@Wezesha

https://www.facebook.com/salome.mbugua.98;

@wezeshadada;

@akidwa

 

ACTION BREAKS SILENCE - creating safer communities

ACTION BREAKS SILENCE - creating safer communities

Debi will be running a Personal Safety talk and demonstration at the FiLiA conference

Gender-based violence is a global problem. In the UK, approximately 585,000 women are raped or sexually assaulted in England and Wales alone every year and 2 women die at the hands of their intimate partner every week. In India, 848 women or girls are either harassed, raped or killed every single day. And in South Africa, rapes are estimated to take place every 26 seconds and it is thought that almost half of all women will be raped in their lifetime.

"Nos quitaron tanto que acabaron quitandonos hasta el miedo"

"Nos quitaron tanto que acabaron quitandonos hasta el miedo"

Me he ofrecido a entrevistar a Gloria Vázquez, presidenta de la Organización Ve La Luz, para FiLiA.

Me pregunto si el nombre de Ve La Luz es también un juego de palabras con vela y con velar, tengo muchas preguntas además de esta, preguntas que he reflexionado desde mucho antes, desde el 8 de Marzo para ser más concreta, cuando me llegaron noticias de que había un grupo de mujeres haciendo huelga de hambre en La Puerta del Sol en Madrid. Qué valientes, pensé en su momento.

“THEY TOOK EVERYTHING FROM US, EVEN FEAR”

 “THEY TOOK EVERYTHING FROM US, EVEN FEAR”

I have offered to interview Gloria Vazquez, president of the Spanish activist organisation Ve La Luz (See The Light in English, but it can also be a play on words – vela meaning candle, or velar, to watch over).

Gloria transmits a sense of fearless urgency. I ask about the hunger strike I knew of (there have actually been four so far), the one in Puerta del Sol in Madrid. Gloria interrupts me to tell me the point she has made many times to the press and politicians: they weren’t on hunger strike – they were making visible the thousands of women effectively forced into involuntary hunger strikes by a government that only gives financial help to 26% of victims of gender violence.

Polish Feminism & Women’s Strike

Polish Feminism & Women’s Strike

As far as Polish feminism goes, I think most of the world only learned of its existence last year. When Polish women marched through the streets of Poland, and beyond, on the 3rd of October 2016, the whole world watched in astonishment. I have to admit, I did too, despite the fact that I am a Polish woman and a feminist myself. Prior to that day, I believed I was living in a world where the words ‘Polish’ and ‘feminism’ did not really mix, and even when they did come together, it was not a comfortable coupling. Obviously, there had been feminists in Poland for a long time, but the country hadn’t seen anything like last year’s show of feminist solidarity before.

The Pimping of Prostitution

The Pimping of Prostitution

The Pimping of Prostitution: Abolishing the Sex Work Myth
Book launch and discussion on the 11th October (link below)
by Julie Bindel

Julie Bindel, author of The Pimping of Prostitution, will outline the key themes of her book and share details of her extraordinary journey travelling the world to uncover the truth about the sex trade. Julie will be joined in a panel discussion with sex trade survivors from the UK, Australia and USA/Canada who will be sharing their personal knowledge and experience about the sex trade.

The speakers will be discussing the most effective methods to abolish the system of prostitution.

LONDON FEMINIST FILM FESTIVAL

LONDON FEMINIST FILM FESTIVAL

The London Feminist Film Festival is back in August and is pairing up with the BFI to screen The Sealed Soil, the first ever film by an independent Iranian woman director, Marva Nabili, who had to smuggle the film out of 1970s Iran as the revolution unfolded. First screened in the UK in 1977 by the BFI, it tells the story of a young woman who resists patriarchal rule in a small village, and faces social backlash for defying her family’s pressure to get married. LFFF is bringing it back for its 40th anniversary.

Boots birth control controversy

Boots birth control controversy

Boots birth control controversy reveals Britain’s barriers to women’s reproductive freedom
by Kirstie Summers, FiLiA volunteer
July 2017

In 2016, it was revealed that women in Britain have to pay up to five times more for the morning after pill than women in Europe.

The European Consortium for Emergency Contraception, a group working to expand knowledge about and access to emergency contraception, released research comparing availability across the continent. It found that emergency contraception could be bought in France for as little as 7€, while in Britain it can cost as much as 42€, or £31.60. The prices in Britain and Ireland are the highest in all of Europe.