SUNDAY OPENING

OPENING: JUTE MILL SONG
PERFORMED BY SHONAGH GLEN
(WRITTEN BY MARY BROOKSBANK)

Written by Mary Brooksbank, millworker, socialist and trade unionist, and performed by Shonagh Glen, the Jute Mill Song brings home the hardships faced by those working in the mill. I first heard this song on a Feminist weekend and knew straight away that we had to bring Shonagh’s voice and the memory of her grandma teaching her the words to the conference. In memory of all the women who were worked so hard by the industrialists. And with thanks to Shonagh and her Grandma.

“My grandmother and her sisters all worked in the Dundee jute mills. Their mother had been a "half-timer" as a girl - working half the day and allowed to go to school the other half. My grandfather, on the other hand, was blacklisted from the mills after agitating for a strike. I feel lucky to have been steeped in feminist and labour politics all my life, and I'm sure my grandparents would have been very proud that I have been asked to sing The Jute Mill Song for FiLiA attendees. Thank you!”
Shonagh Glen

 

VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN:
A WAR CRIME IN THE COLOMBIAN PEACE ACCORD
LOUISE WINSTANLEY

In 2016, the Colombian Government and the FARC guerrilla signed a Peace Accord to end an internal armed conflict, which had disproportionately affected women. With eight million victims of violence, for many women, this conflict was a continuum of violence, aggravated by systemic inequality and a lack of economic resources for a dignified life.

Internationally, the Colombian Peace Accord is considered to be one of the most integrated peace agreements ever achieved. One remarkable element of the negotiations was the establishment of a gender sub-commission, which highlighted the gender dimension of the conflict and the need to address this in all of the chapters of the Peace Accord. This, alongside the work of Colombian Women’s Organisations, ensured a strong, influential and pervading gender focus in the Peace Accord.

Today, two years after the Peace Accord was signed, many of the problems of inequality, in particular women’s limited access to land, have still not been addressed properly. Equality is still something women will have to strive for.

Louise will review the process, current status and look to the future, with a focus on the impact on women.

KEYNOTE

PERFORMANCE: A SCULLERY MAID'S MONOLOGUE; A WOMAN’S WORTH
MARY DUGGAN

Requested to write a poem for a London Borough’s centenary celebration of Uk women winning partial suffrage the poet, Mary Duggan, wrote and performed her ‘Scullery Maid’s Monologue: A Woman's Worth’ Using historical material (See: The Palmers Green Recorder 1914*) Mary Duggan presents this Scullery maid hearing household opinions about The Suffragette and clash between N.13 north London Suffragettes and a local crowd of men* In fact local activist residents included Emily Pankhurst’s own brother and sister: Mr. Goulden and Mrs. Mary Clarke and the infamous Garrett sisters...


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