MERLY ÅSBOGÅRD

MERLY ÅSBOGÅRD

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL LAW THAT WAS NEVER IMPLEMENTED

Last year the Swedish “sexbuyers law” celebrated 20 years. The Swedish government is quick to let people know from all around the world what a great success it is.

Sadly, the truth is another story. Yes; it is criminal to buy sex but the people in prostitution, mainly women has received little or no help to leave prostitution. When we try to file reports, we are being heavily discriminated against. The stigma is alive and well because we never implemented the other side of the law which was caring for the victims of prostitution.

Not implementing the law meant that it was up to Government officials and municipal bodies to have their own opinion regarding if help was there duty, it often meant no help at all.

We are now trying to change that.

LUBA FEIN

LUBA FEIN

FROM SWEDEN TO ISRAEL IN 20 YEARS: PASSING THE SEX PURCHASE ACT

Often sex trade seems impossible to beat.

They have billions of dollars, while we only have our truth.

They tell men that exploiting vulnerable women is normal and acceptable, while we expect them to change.

They promise lawmakers legendary profits that will flow to the economy and state coffers if the sex trade is decriminalized. We require investment in law enforcement and rehabilitation of victims.

Seemingly, this war has already been lost. But against all odds, in just 10 years, 7 countries have adopted the Swedish model of banning the purchase of prostitution, while not a single country decriminalized the sex trade.

Norway

Iceland

Canada

Northern Ireland

France

Ireland

And now Israel too.

Behind each of the seven victories is a story. A story of uncompromising struggle, strenuous work and unmatched female solidarity. I am here to tell you our story - a story of Israeli abolitionism.

 

MERCEDES HERNANDEZ

MERCEDES HERNANDEZ

FEMINICIDIO: DEL (MAL LLAMADO) ÍNTIMO AL GENOCIDIO SEXUALIZADO

FEMICIDE: BY (BADLY NAMED) INTIMATE PARTNERS IN SEXUALISED GENOCIDE

The analysis of crimes based on gender in the Genocide Ixil or Sepur Zarco cases, among other cases of genocidal violence in Guatemala, can contribute both to answering and problematizing the question of whether feminicide is a modality of genocide.

Currently, 16 Latin American countries have criminalized the crime of femicide in the domestic jurisdiction, responding to a social demand that urged to adapt and improve the state response to the protection of women's lives, given the high rates of femicides perpetrated both in the near environment of the victims as by strangers. This last aspect - the depersonalization of gender crime - has served as a catalyst to propose, mainly from anthropology, sociology and critical studies of Law, the existence of a mode of extermination of women by the mere fact of being women which also questions us about the very meaning of what we now call war.

A parallel journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, in the light of International Human Rights Law, updates the unjustifiable and late typification of the international crime of sexual violence as a paradigm of the resistances of the Academy and the courts to admit socio-relevance legal status of attacks and differentiated impacts suffered by victims based on their sex. And how the legal figure feminicide makes its way, with similar difficulties, towards its consideration as an international crime, in the face of huge questions about its homologous or constitutive nature of genocide

LYNN ALDERSON

LYNN ALDERSON

DEMYSTIFYING CONSCIOUSNESS RAISING: INTRODUCTION TO CONSCIOUSNESS RAISING

This workshop for all women who would like to know more about Consciousness Raising (CR). CR is the group technique in which women use their personal experience to explore their own oppression and to work towards political understanding and collective strength. We will form a group for this session and work on the basis that everyone will participate. The personal is political.

RACHEL MCMAHON

RACHEL MCMAHON

The Creative Vulva Appreciation Workshop

The session is designed to interactively explore how we have been socialised to think of our vulvas, the language and attitudes we were raised with and how we can positively reclaim and revere our genitalia as a powerful  part of our womanhood. The ability to experience sexual pleasure and give life has been a power patriarchy has sought to limit and control through FGM, lack of reproductive rights and medicalisation. Our vulvas have also been the site of sexual violence, abuse, hurt and shame. Young women grow up encouraged to never speak of them, shave and even change them via labiaplasty. In the session a combination of origami, claymodelling, discussion, books, colouring in and video clips will help women explore these issues in a playful yet serious way so we can reclaim the positive life affirming power of the vulva. In case folk might be worried (or disappointed) there will be no nudity in the session – self examination and the weaving of flowers and jewels into our pubic hair is for another time!

And there will be cake – fabulous cake, including gluten free and vegan fabulous cake.

Women Only

KAREN INGALA SMITH

KAREN INGALA SMITH

NAMING FEMICIDE – AN ACT OF RESISTANCE: OVERVIEW AND UK PERSPECTIVE

Femicide,  most often conceptualised as the killing of women by men because they’re women, isn’t even a formally recognised term in the UK, yet there are differences in contexts and motivations  between the killing s of women and men, there is also a tendency to overlook killings that are committed outside the context of domestic violence.  In addition, although the killing of women by men is a global issue, there are differences in international patterns.

This panel will include a focus on femicide in Latin America and the UK.  We will also look at the killings of women in the sex trade and the killings of women where BDSM/rough-sex gone wrong is used as a defence.

Jill Radford said that to name, define and promote awareness of femicide is to generate resistance. This panel is proud to be part of the feminist movement’s fight to end all forms of men’s violence against women and girls.

CLASS OPPRESSION AND THE EFFECT ON WORKING CLASS WOMEN

CLASS OPPRESSION AND THE EFFECT ON WORKING CLASS WOMEN

The key questions we will be exploring:

How does classism impact on women's lives and women activist's lives?

How do working class women rise up to take on the oppressive system whilst at the same time we are being forced to live in austerity and poverty?

Working class women are often facing racism and classism and many other oppressions at the same time - how does this affect us as activists?

How can we build a women's movement with poor, working class and women of colour at the centre?

Many women activists are working without resource and our people are constantly targeted by the media.

We are living in a class society which forces women to compete for resources and pits us against each other.

Our very challenging times mean that working together is essential if we are to change the financial system and sort out the climate crisis.

We will explore the impact of the roles we play within society and how oppression and colonisation have affected our lives and our communities and the world as a whole.

To build an inclusive women's movement that has poor working class and women of colour at the centre we have to learn about and act against the impact of classism and racism on working class women's lives.

This short talk will lead into a diverse panel of Bradford women activists who will talk about what they do and how class and race affects their lives as women and as activists.

Then there will be time for discussion and questions.

FIONA MACKENZIE

FIONA MACKENZIE

WE CAN’T CONSENT TO THIS

The death of a woman or girl in a “sex game gone wrong” has too long been reported as an isolated incident. And we now know that claims of “consent” to violence are not rare, and that these cases are not restricted to the UK. We've found that in almost all cases, these deaths are unlawful killings of a woman or girl by a man, and claiming "she asked for it" gives a chance of a lesser charge, lighter sentence, or a death not being investigated as a crime at all. 

In our research on these cases, we've seen failures at every stage of the criminal justice system, and embedded myths that women commonly consent to sexual violence that kills or injures them.We Can't Consent to This wants to clarify law and change policy on consent - so it's clear that women can't be assumed to consent to this violence.Fiona will update on progress in making these changes, and what we need to do next.

JAHNINE DAVIS

JAHNINE DAVIS

WHERE ARE THE BLACK GIRLS? ARE THERE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN RACIALISED SEXUALISATION AND THE UNDER-IDENTIFICATION OF CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE AMONG BLACK BRITISH GIRLS?

The experiences of Black girls more specifically Black British African-Caribbean are rarely captured in literature, however even more so when discussing child sexual abuse. This is evident by dearth of research in the UK.

This presentation will share the findings from a MA research project focused on whether racialised sexualisation impacts on the identification and response to child sexual abuse and how Black girls are located on the boundaries of childhood within and outside the home.